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Don't Skimp on Zinc

Apr 30, 2019

Zinc promotes consistent emergence. Hybrids that get a strong start are better equipped to meet their yield potential. Zinc is a catalyst for enzyme creation and is a precursor for auxin hormones that signal seed germination. When early zinc levels are adequate, there is more consistent seed germination and emergence.

Healthy root development requires zinc. Because zinc is an essential component for many enzymes, it’s no wonder it’s so important for the growth and development of healthy roots. Adequate zinc levels and quicker emergence tend to lead to more robust early root growth in the corn plant. This sets the plant up for a bigger root footprint, earlier in the year, to capture water and nutrients.

When zinc is sufficient, so are other nutrients. If zinc helps build healthy roots, it makes sense that the uptake of other nutrients would also increase with sufficient zinc. Winfield United® analyzed over 9,400 tissue samples taken from farms in Minnesota, and found increased levels of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sulfur when zinc levels were sufficient in the plant.

Zinc is immobile in soil and tissue, so it’s critical that plants have a constant supply throughout the season to meet growth and development needs. In addition to a seed treatment, you can boost early-season zinc levels with a starter fertilizer. Tissue samples can help identify opportunities where foliar applications may be beneficial as the season progresses or consider planned applications of dry zinc fertilizers before the next season.


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